Old Spanish documents indicate that the renowned explorers, Ferdinand Magellan and Miguel Lopez de Legaspi landed in Camiguin in 1565, respectively. The first Spanish settlements in what was later to be known as Guinsiliban as established in 1598.

Several centuries-old Spanish Colonial and 20th century churches are found in various parts of the island.

Some of the most iconic structures in Camiguin are survivors of violent volcanic eruptions.

Sunken Cemetery / Catarman

Sunken Cemetery / Catarman

A prime example is the Sunken Cemetery in the town of Catarman. Established in 1679, the town was home to the first Spanish settlement on the island but it was severely damaged during the eruption of Mt. Vulcan. 
A part of Catarman, including the local graveyard was washed out into the sea. Today, the cemetery, with its towering white cross is one of Camiguin’s most popular tourist spots. 

Old Church Ruin / Catarman

Old Church Ruin / Catarman

Santo Rosario Church: The Santo Rosario Church in the municipality of Sagay was built in 1882.
Old Catarman Church Ruins: The church of the Old Catarman town was destroyed and partly submerged by volcanic debris during the eruption and formation of Mt. Vulcan from 1871 to 1875. Also known as Gui-ob Church, only the ruins of the church and bell tower remains of the old town.

The Santo Rosario Church / Sagay

The Santo Rosario Church / Sagay

Beautiful and ornate ancestral homes and centennial tress  that date back to the Spanish Colonial Period and American Colonial Period, are still abundant and can be found along the streets of Camiguin.

Centenial tree / Mambajao

Centenial tree / Mambajao

Moro watch tower / Guinsiliban

Moro watch tower / Guinsiliban